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Coaching Management 23.2

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CoachesNetwork.com Coaching Management PRESEASON 2015 23 the way of being honest with ourselves. The following prompts allow you to take a step back from the day-to-day grind, so you can take a step forward in your career. Do I talk WItH my boss? Regardless of the level you coach at, there is a person who is your supervisor, usually an athletic director. What is your relation- ship with this person like? Is it based on trust or obligation? Are the conversations you have with your boss supportive and positive, or negative and critical? Or do you ignore each other most of the time? You may not have thought about it before, but your relationship with your supervisor is a critical factor in keeping your job and improving as a coach. For example, let's say you have an argument with an athlete's par- ent. You are sure the parent is in the wrong and you are in the right. If you've developed a good relationship with your athletic direc- tor, he or she will likely have your back and help you through it. But without that sup- port, you may have a crisis that pushes your coaching career several steps back—regard- less of how well you handle the situation. MIKE DAVENPORT, EdD, is Director of Rowing, Head Coach of Women's Rowing, and Assistant to the Athletic Director for Professional Development and Compliance at Washington College. Coaching for more than 35 years, he has worked on the staff of several national and Olympic rowing teams and writes about professional sustainability for coaches at: www.coachingsportstoday.com. He can also be reached at: mdavenport2@washcoll.edu. Maybe you feel like you don't want or need help from your supervisor. Know this: a big part of athletic directors' jobs is to man- age coaches, and they often have insights into ways any coach can improve. Your boss might have a big-picture perspective you can't see or understand unless you talk to each other. In the book, Why Good Coaches Quit— And How You Can Stay In The Game, authors John Anderson and Rick Aberman empha- size the work it takes on both ends for neces- sary conversations to happen: "Sometimes we don't think the administrators are inter- ested ... But then we rarely take the time to go and talk to them. If we sought out our athletic directors more often, we might find out that they are more responsive and accountable than we imagined." Topics to talk about can range from orga- nizational issues to coaching techniques. Ath- letic directors are busy, so it is best to schedule times for conversations and come with your questions and comments written down. The relationship with your boss doesn't need to be based in friendship, but you do want him or her to like you. It's human nature to help someone you like, and it's common for a supervisor to go the extra mile for an employee when there's a positive relationship. A healthy partnership of mutu- al respect can lead to job advancement, and provides you with an important advocate in your corner. But what if you don't like your athletic director? The important question here is: Do you trust her or him? Although enjoying each other's company is always nice, trust is the critical factor. If you don't have trust, it might be a sign you need third-party guid- ance, possibly from human resources. HoW Do I vIeW my atHletes? Positive rapport with athletes means you can lead them to greatness, while discord may be a significant source of stress. If there are conflicts between you and your team, it may Circle No. 113 Circle No. 114 Made in America See our Web Page at: www.memphisnet.net or e-mail us at: sportsinfo@memphisnet.net 800-354-5663 www.crimsonstone.com Ultimate I (Infield Conditioner) Ultimate II (Warning Track) Ultimate Mound & Plate Mix (Pitcher Mound & Batters Box) Ultimate Bricks (Pitcher Mound & Batters Box) Ultimate Infield Mix (Specialty Blends) Ultimate Base (Sand/Clay Blends) The Ultimate Series Products were developed to help coaches and groundskeepers solve many of the problems in maintaining high performance infields, warning tracks, and pitchers mounds. For over a decade the Ultimate Series has been the choice of professional, college, high school, and recreational organizations. Click Here to sign up for our free series of educational digital newsletters

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